Charles Carneal Honored with Margaret Sharpe Award

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At the 33rd Annual CARE Breakfast, Charles (Charlie) Carneal will be honored with the Margaret Sharpe Award for his years of service to CARE and the Dallas community. Charlie is currently on the CARE Dallas Volunteer Council and served as Chairman of the Board in 2007. For many years Charlie has served as a leader in CARE's New Directions classes, as well as volunteering for community events.

"Charlie has been an outstanding CARE board member for years.  We can always count on Charlie to be the first to sign up to help and attend events," said Jan Osborn, 2016 Margaret Sharpe Award Honoree. "He has dedicated himself to local high school students who attend New Directions classes and has been an inspiration to everyone who has gone through the CARE programs."

Charlie Carneal is a proud fifth-generation Texan, fourth-generation Dallasite, and second-generation SMU alumnus. Charlie attended SMU on academic and athletic scholarships, graduating with a B.B.A. (Real Estate) degree in 1973. Professionally, Charlie was Top Producer for Dave Perry-Miller & Associates for 2005 and is a consistent producer. He has been named one of the “Best Real Estate Agents in Dallas” by D Magazine multiple times, and has been profiled in Park Cities People. He was one of two elected representatives of the Park Cities/North Dallas MLS for 2007 and 2008 and is a member of two networking groups for Realtors.

Seats are still available for the CARE Breakfast on November 15th. Purchase your ticket or sponsor a table today!

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

How to Talk to Your Child About Drugs

Maybe your back to school list includes new clothes, notebooks, lunch box, and a quick trip to the dentist. But let's add one more thing - a real conversation with your kids about drugs.

Children today are exposed to tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs at increasingly younger ages. Modern media is full of images that promote smoking and drinking as a cool, fun, and natural part of life. That's why, more than ever, parents need to talk to their kids about the hazards of drugs and help them separate fact from fiction. But how do you get started?

According to experts, it's best to develop an ongoing dialogue with your child -- starting in the preschool years if possible -- and to look for spontaneous, everyday situations, or "teachable moments," in which to lay the groundwork for open, honest communication. The best news? Research shows that children who hear the facts about drugs and alcohol from their parents are significantly less likely to use them. Here's how to begin.

Ages 3 to 5
During the preschool years, children have strong ties to their family and seek their parents' approval. This is a great time to teach kids about good nutrition, proper hygiene, and developing a healthy lifestyle. It's also a good time to help children develop the decision-making and problem-solving skills they'll need later in life.

Between the ages of 3 and 5:

  • Talk to your child about the joys of healthy living. Discuss how good she feels when she's eaten a nutritious meal, gotten enough rest, and taken care of her body. Talk about how a healthy child can run, jump, and play for hours on end.
     
  • Allow your child to make some decisions. Whenever possible, let your child make simple choices, such as what to wear or what to have for lunch. Even if his clothes are slightly mismatched, or he asks for peanut butter and jelly yet again, it's important now to reinforce his ability to make decisions.
     
  • Encourage your child to be responsible for her health and well-being. Turn chores such as brushing teeth, putting away toys, wiping up spills, and caring for pets into fun experiences your child will enjoy. Break down the activities into manageable steps so that she learns to develop plans and solve problems.
     
  • Teach your child about dangerous substances in his environment. Point out poisonous substances in your home, such as bleach or kitchen cleansers, and read the product warning labels out loud to your child. Explain that harmful substances don't always come with such "warnings," and that your child should only ingest a food or prescribed medication that either you, a relative, or other known caregiver has given him.

Ages 5 to 8
As children enter school and spend more time around their peers, they become more influenced by the media and world around them. They're open now to new ideas and messages but definitely need your help to make sense of all this information.

Between the ages of 5 and 8:

  • Let your child know how you feel about tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs. Keep your discussions factual and focused on the present. (Future consequences are too distant to have any meaning.) Let them know, for instance, that being high on alcohol or drugs makes it harder to play ball, finish a puzzle, or do other things they enjoy, and that smoking causes bad breath.
     
  • Talk to your child about drug-related messages in the media. Some TV shows, movies, music videos, and ads glamorize the use of tobacco, alcohol, or drugs. Ask your child whether these vehicles make drugs seem cool and acceptable, or whether they also show their downside. Encourage your child to ask questions or share concerns about the things he's seeing and hearing.
     
  • Set clear family rules about drug use, and examine your own actions. Tell children why you don't want them to take drugs, smoke, or drink. And always try to be a good role model. Your actions speak louder than words.
     
  • Help kids build problem-solving skills. If your child is having trouble with homework, a friendship, or a bully at school, help her pinpoint the problem and find long-term solutions. Point out that "quick fixes" don't work. If it's hard for your child to have a one-on-one conversation with you, have her paint or draw a picture, write a story, or send an e-mail to a trusted friend or relative.
     
  • Get to know your child's friends and their parents. Check in by phone or visit every once in a while to make sure that these families share the same values as you do about tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. (This is a good rule to follow when your child gets older as well.)

Ages 8 - 18
During the tween and preteen years, children may begin to assert their independence and question your authority, but they need your input and advice more than ever. In fact, when it comes to the issue of drug use, this is one of the most important times in a child's life.

Beginning at age 8:

  • Make sure your child knows your rules about drug use and the consequences if they're broken. Kids this age can understand the reason for rules and appreciate having limits in place (whether or not they'll admit it!). What's more, research shows that children are less likely to use tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs if their parents have established a pattern of setting clear rules and consequences for breaking them.
     
  • Teach your child how to say "no" to drugs. Kids who don't know how to respond when offered alcohol, cigarettes, or drugs, or who don't know how to get out of sticky situations, are more likely to give in to peer pressure. Act out some real-life situations with your child and brainstorm solutions for what she can say. For instance: "My mom (or dad) would kill me if I smoked a cigarette," or "No thanks. I don't do drugs." Also, be sure your child knows that she shouldn't continue friendships with kids who have offered her drugs.
     
  • Help build your child's self-esteem. Puberty can erode your child's self-confidence and cause him at times to feel insecure, doubtful, and vulnerable to peer pressure. During these years, give your child lots of positive reinforcement and praise him for both his efforts and his successes.
     
  • Give your child the power to make decisions that go against his peers. Encourage your child to pick out the sneakers that he likes, for example, rather than the pair that many of his friends have. Or urge your daughter to hang out with true friends rather than with kids in the cool crowd.
     
  • Base drug- and alcohol-related messages on facts -- not fear. Kids this age love to learn facts (even strange ones) about all kinds of things. You can take advantage of their passion for learning to reinforce your message about drugs.
     
  • Keep your conversations in "present tense." Tweens and preteens aren't concerned with future problems that might result from experimenting with tobacco, alcohol, or other drugs. On the other hand, they are concerned about their appearance, sometimes to the point of obsession. So if they believe that drug use will impair their looks or health, they might be likely to avoid these practices. You can also tell them that cigarettes can cause smelly hair and "ashtray breath" or that their performance in the school play or on the football team will suffer if they are high on marijuana.
     
  • Help children separate reality from fantasy. Watch TV and movies with your kids, and ask lots of questions to reinforce the distinction between what is real and make-believe. Remember to talk about advertising, too, as those messages are especially powerful.
     
  • Encourage healthy, creative activities. Look for ways to get your child involved in sports, hobbies, school clubs, and other activities that reduce boredom and excess free time. Encourage positive friendships and interests, and look for activities that you and your child can do together.

Sources: Partnership for a Drug-Free America; The Nemours Foundation; American Academy of Pediatrics

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

Partnering with Saint Michael and All Angels

We are overjoyed with the recently created partnership between Saint Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church and CARE Dallas. CARE has a long history of providing a safe and confidential place for anyone struggling with drug or alcohol misuse. Since the early 80’s, CARE has provided education programs in schools and community settings to both youth and adults. But mostly we are a place to start when a person decides to get help for a substance use disorder.

Stained glass artwork from the Columbarium Doors at Saint Michaels and All Angels.

Stained glass artwork from the Columbarium Doors at Saint Michaels and All Angels.

The new CARE office is located in a building owned by Saint Michaels and All Angels (SMAA). The space was generously offered to our organization at no cost for three years. Partnering with SMAA broadens our audience and increases opportunities to serve our community. The CARE team will have the opportunity to provide drug and alcohol programming for multiple audiences within the congregation as well as access to meeting rooms for CARE-related meetings.

SMAA is also providing exposure for CARE via their newsletter and online communities which will increase awareness of CARE's role in the community. And finally, CARE is able to host community-wide programs at the SMAA facility.

Addiction affects all aspects of our community – teens, families, parents, schools, the workplace, and even the faith community; yet, because of the stigma associated with alcohol dependence, we are often hesitant to reach out for help. CARE is working hard to reduce the stigma associated with addiction so that individuals and families can get the help they need.

CARE is now located at 8100 Lomo Alto in suite 219.  Please feel free to drop by anytime to learn more about the mission of CARE.  Or you can call us at 214.526.8986 or follow us on Facebook.

We are here to help. We are here to serve.  We CARE.

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

CARE Scholarship Winners

CARE Dallas is pleased to announce the winners of its 2017 Scholarship Essay Contest! The winners were chosen based on their commitment to making healthy choices regarding the use of alcohol and other drugs as demonstrated in a personal essay.

Each winner is the recipient of a $1000 scholarship. Funds to support the scholarship were raised during the CARE Scholarship Raffle which was organized by CARE volunteers and spearheaded by board member, Robin Bagwell. 

 

Lily Finkle,  Bishop Lynch High School. Lily will be attending Texas Tech University.

Lily Finkle,  Bishop Lynch High School. Lily will be attending Texas Tech University.

 
Ali Garrett, Highland Park High School. Ali will attend SMU in the fall. 

Ali Garrett, Highland Park High School. Ali will attend SMU in the fall. 

 
Caitlyn Johnson, Bishop Lynch High School , will travel to Indiananola, Iowa to attend Simpson College

Caitlyn Johnson, Bishop Lynch High School , will travel to Indiananola, Iowa to attend Simpson College

 
Rene Reeder, Saint Mark’s School of Texas. Rene will be attending Rice University.

Rene Reeder, Saint Mark’s School of Texas. Rene will be attending Rice University.

 
Sara Rodriquez, Bishop Dunne Catholic School. Sara will be in Austin attending the University of Texas.

Sara Rodriquez, Bishop Dunne Catholic School. Sara will be in Austin attending the University of Texas.

 
Trey Thomas, Bishop Lynch High School. Trey will attend Baylor University

Trey Thomas, Bishop Lynch High School. Trey will attend Baylor University

 

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

CARE Announces Speakers for 33rd Annual Breakfast Event

The CARE Board of Directors is pleased to announce the featured speakers for the 33rd Annual CARE Breakfast, Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 8:00 a.m. at the Dallas Country Club.

Mackenzie Phillips is best known as an actress with roles in American Graffiti and One Day At A Time. Her story, like addiction, isn’t pretty or scrubbed clean of the brokenness or the wreckage. Her powerful message contrasts the despair of addiction with the hope of recovery. Her current vocation as a substance abuse and addiction counselor with Breathe Life Healing Center in New York, as well as an author, is part of that message.

Brad Lamm, founder of Breathe Life Healing Center, is a well-known speaker and author who has produced programs on addiction for Oprah and Dr. Oz.

Tables are expected to sell quickly. Table sponsorships can be reserved by clicking the button below. For more information please contact the CARE office at 214-526-8986 or email at info@care-dallas.org.

33rd Annual CARE Breakfast
Featured Guest: Brad Lamm and Mackenzie Phillips
Honorary Event Chairs: Lindsay and George Billingsley
Margaret Sharpe Award Honoree: Charles Carneal
Community Partner Honoree: JDs Chipperry

Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 8:00 a.m.
Dallas Country Club, 4155 Mockingbird Ln, Dallas, TX 75205

The Annual CARE Breakfast supports CARE’s mission to respond to the increasing concerns and challenges associated with alcohol and drug abuse in our community. With the help of generous sponsors we can provide the resources that the Dallas community needs to face and conquer addiction.

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

CARE Art Contest Promotes Drug-Free Student Life

Each year local elementary and middle school students draw their original interpretations of the dangers of substance abuse. This project began as a way to entice children to think about the consequences of using alcohol and other drugs.

In addition, teachers have a wonderful opportunity to discuss with their students the effects of substance abuse and how drugs and alcohol can negatively affect their lives.

This year CARE Dallas received many submissions, but the staff has selected 12 winners whose artwork will be displayed at NorthPark Center in the North Court from April 11-22.

 

1. Caroline "Be Yourself Don't Let Drugs Ruin You"

Caroline is in the 7th grade and she has a passion for piano, horseback riding, and volunteer work. In her spare time she finds it necessary to relax in order to keep up with her busy schedule.  She has a very close relationship with her family and enjoys entering art competitions. 

 

2. Harper "Don't Put Drugs On Your Grocery List"

Harper is in the 3rd grade and she likes to sing and play the guitar. When she’s not at school, she likes to read and draw. Harper loves to spend time with her 6 year old sister and also enjoys visiting Wyoming during the hot summer months.

 

3. Zoe "Don't Let Drugs Create Sadness In An Otherwise Happy Situation"

Playing soccer and baking are two of Zoe's favorite activities. She is a student in the 5th grade, and she also creates artwork and plays sports. Zoe loves her family and her pets very much.

 

4. Sasha "Let Sharks Chase Away Drugs"

Sasha is in the 4th grade and has a passion for tennis and swimming. After school she loves to play games and spend time with her family. Over the summer Sasha wants to set up a stand to collect money to help a local charity.

 

5. Hailey "Don't Let Drugs Trick You, They Are Not A Treat"

Hailey is in the 7th grade and she likes to play soccer with her team “Sting”. In her spare time she loves to swim. Hailey is also part of a group called "WE Group" that organizes fundraisers in order to help others.

 

6. Rachel "Wipe Out Drugs"

Rachel is in the 5th grade and plays soccer, basketball, and softball. She also likes to be outdoors with her family. This summer Rachel will be attending camps and helping her brother who has autism.

 

7. Gen "Hoo Would Want To Do Drugs"

Gen is in the 8th grade and she loves to play tennis.  When she’s not on the courts, she likes to create art and play with her dog. Over the summer Gen would like to volunteer at an animal shelter.

 

8. Stella "Drugs Are On The Lowest Level"

Stella is in the 5th grade and she has a passion for art. In her spare time she likes to read. Stella's summer plans include making food baskets for the homeless in Dallas.

 

9. Nico "Hit Drugs Out Of The Ballpark"

Nico is in the 2nd grade and he enjoys football, wrestling, swimming, and tae kwon do. When he’s not playing sports, he plays with his older brother and finishes homework. Over the summer Nico wants to give thanks to the local police officers for their service.

 

10. Helen "Don't Let Drugs End Your Journey"

Helen is in the 5th grade and she loves knitting and sewing clothes. When she’s not creating with needle and thread, she plays with her cat and rides horses. Over the summer she will help her school collect cleaning supplies for Habitat for Humanity.

 

11. Zariah "Drugs Live In Black And White You Should Live In Color"

Zariah is in the 5th grade and her favorite sport is track and field, but her passion is playing the  violin. In fact, she has been playing the violin since age three. In her spare time she reads. Over the summer she wants to help clean homes that may contain hazardous items.

 

12. Sofi "Don't Let Drugs Steal Your Life"

Sofi is in the 5th grade and she likes writing stories and letters. In her spare time she loves to play with her sister and pets.  Over the summer Sofi wants to volunteer for a mission trip to serve children in underprivileged countries.

 

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

Giving Tuesday

Black Friday, Cyber Monday, now Giving Tuesday! #GivingTuesday is a global day of giving and you can join in by supporting CARE Dallas. Every gift goes directly toward making education and resources about substance use disorder available to the Dallas community.

Give today and then share about why you are supporting CARE Dallas. 

 

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

CARE Breakfast Offers Laughs and Support for Those in Recovery

The 32nd Annual CARE Breakfast was a wonderful success, and we have you to thank. Your presence and support is proof that the Dallas community is committed to providing the resources so desperately needed for families affected by substance use disorders.


And thanks to all of our sponsors and donors, we raised an incredible $220,000 to support current and future programs at CARE Dallas. As the year draws to a close, we encourage you to think of CARE when a friend or family member needs care for alcohol or drug-related situations. Our confidential services are available to the entire Dallas area and our staff is prepared to help.

 

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

Dallas Students Vote to be Drug Free for Red Ribbon Week

In honor of Red Ribbon Week, the CARE Dallas staff and volunteers are supporting 15 Dallas-area schools with educational programs. The theme of this year's campaign is "I Vote to Be Drug Free," and the information and interactive activities focus on making smart choices.

CARE Dallas also provided 9,000 red ribbons and 6,000 red bracelets to students at participating schools. Thank you to our volunteers who helped to count and sort red ribbon supplies into bundles for each school.

Everyone can participate in Red Ribbon Week by signing our Red Ribbon Pledge! Add your name, then share the pledge with other parents and guardians to be a part of creating a drug free America!

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

CARE's Two Newest Employees

The CARE Dallas team is proud to welcome two new staff members at the CARE office. Virgina Parma is serving as our accountant and Kellie King, MS, LPC-I, is CARE’s Community Resource Counselor. 

 

VIRGINIA PARMA

Virginia Parma graduated for the University of Texas at Austin with a Masters in Professional Accountancy. Mrs. Parma worked in public accounting and corporate accounting for
many years and has also served as Treasurer of the Junior League Ball, her local Parent Teacher Association and several other nonprofits. She also served as a board Member of the Park Cities YMCA. Mrs. Parma and her husband have three children who graduated from Highland Park High School. She is glad for the opportunity to work with CARE and its mission for our community.  

 

KELLIE KING

Kellie King, MS, LPC-I, brings a unique skill set to her role as CARE’s Community Resource Counselor. Ms. King earned a Bachelor of Arts in English and Art History from Hobart and William Smith Colleges and her Masters of Science degree in Counseling from Southern Methodist University with specialty training in Addictions, Adolescent Therapy, Sexual Therapy, and Group Therapy. Ms. King is a Licensed Professional Counselor – Intern, and has worked with people seeking counseling for a variety of mental health challenges. Ms. King has worked with the high-risk adolescent population in the Frisco ISD, adults struggling with drug and alcohol addiction at several different intensive outpatient programs, as well as provided group support for women working on their sexual addictions. Prior to her counseling career, Ms. King spent many years as a television producer for Inside Edition and Fox News Channel but it was an inner calling she could no longer ignore which led her to this path of helping people through life’s difficulties especially those touched by addiction.

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

David Feherty to Speak at 2016 CARE Breakfast

David Feherty will be the featured speaker at the 2016 CARE Breakfast.

David Feherty will be the featured speaker at the 2016 CARE Breakfast.

The CARE Dallas team is pleased to announce David Feherty as the featured speaker at our 32nd Annual CARE Breakfast on Wednesday, November 9, 2016 at 8:00 a.m. at the Belo Mansion in Dallas.

David Feherty is a former professional golfer and NBC sportscaster. David spent many years battling depression and addiction. Now he uses his story to inspire others through humor and lessons from the green. Feherty has authored six books and founded Feherty’s Troops First Foundation to assist wounded veterans as they return home.

We sincerely desire that any person who is affected by mental illness seek the treatment they need. Susan Hawk, who was originally scheduled for the event, will no longer be speaking at this year’s CARE Breakfast as she continues her journey toward health and wellness. The CARE team wishes Susan and her family the very best as she faces a difficult circumstance.

Due to David Feherty's popularity tables are expected to sell out quickly! Table sponsorships can be reserved at care-dallas.org. For more information please contact the CARE office at 214-526-8986 or email info@care-dallas.org.

 

 

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

CARE Awards $6,000 in College Scholarships to Dallas Students

At the end of the 2015-2016 school year CARE awarded six $1,000 scholarships to selected high school seniors who demonstrated a personal commitment to making positive choices regarding the use of alcohol and other illegal drugs. The CARE team received 75 applications from 25 Dallas-area schools. Twelve finalists were chosen and then six winners were selected by the CARE Board of Directors and staff.

These students have shown leadership and character, and have been a role model to others by standing firm against peer pressure. Each recipient has been shown to reflect the ideals and goals of CARE as we strive to provide chemical addiction awareness and educational resources to the Dallas community.

We are incredibly grateful to the CARE Scholarship Committee who spent many hours reviewing applications and choosing our winners. Thank you to Andrea Bertrand (Committee Chair), Jennifer Miars, Cathy McDowell, Susan McCollum, and Martha Johnston.

 

Scholarship Winners

Madison Scarborough Highland Park HS Activities: Girls Track and Cross Country, Cheerleading Volunteer work: Voice of Hope, Feeding the homeless at Metropolitan Dream Center, Project Transformation at Munger Place Church,  Awards/Honors: Cornerstone Scholar Athlete Award. Favorite camper at Camp Longhorn Plans to attend in the fall: Sewanee University, Sewanee, Tennessee Plans to study: Social Work

Madison Scarborough
Highland Park HS

Activities: Girls Track and Cross Country, Cheerleading

Volunteer work: Voice of Hope, Feeding the homeless at Metropolitan Dream Center, Project Transformation at Munger Place Church, 

Awards/Honors: Cornerstone Scholar Athlete Award. Favorite camper at Camp Longhorn

Plans to attend in the fall: Sewanee University, Sewanee, Tennessee

Plans to study: Social Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maria Mestas Hillcrest High School Activities/Honors: Avid Club, President, Journey Club, Vice President, Interact Club, National Honor Society, Hillcrest High School Outstanding Student Plans to attend in the fall: University of North Texas at Dallas

Maria Mestas
Hillcrest High School

Activities/Honors: Avid Club, President, Journey Club, Vice President, Interact Club, National Honor Society, Hillcrest High School Outstanding Student

Plans to attend in the fall: University of North Texas at Dallas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caroline Yablon Highland Park High School Activities/Honors: ASTRA, Peer Tutor, K-Life, Fellowship of Christian Athletes,  Volunteer work included: Camp Barnabas, Counselor, 5th Grade Tutoring, Children's Hospital, Kids Across America Plans to attend in the fall: McClennan County Community College then transfer to Baylor Plans to study: Business and Apparel Design

Caroline Yablon
Highland Park High School

Activities/Honors: ASTRA, Peer Tutor, K-Life, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, 

Volunteer work included: Camp Barnabas, Counselor, 5th Grade Tutoring, Children's Hospital, Kids Across America

Plans to attend in the fall: McClennan County Community College then transfer to Baylor

Plans to study: Business and Apparel Design

 

 

 

 

 

Christina Archer The Hockaday School Activities/Honors: Honor Council, Cheerleading, Varsity Track and Field, Varsity Swimming and Diving, Varsity Cross Country, H-Club Volunteer work included: Jog for a Cause, National Charities League (Tartan Award), Volunteered in Fiji building chicken coops, communal bathrooms, and helped others with use of English Plans to attend in the fall: University of Texas at Austin

Christina Archer
The Hockaday School

Activities/Honors: Honor Council, Cheerleading, Varsity Track and Field, Varsity Swimming and Diving, Varsity Cross Country, H-Club

Volunteer work included: Jog for a Cause, National Charities League (Tartan Award), Volunteered in Fiji building chicken coops, communal bathrooms, and helped others with use of English

Plans to attend in the fall: University of Texas at Austin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas Jordan Jesuit College Preparatory School of Dallas Activities/Honors: Baseball, Retreat leader, Ignatian Scholars Program, Restores classic cars Volunteer work included: Hunger Busters Plans to attend in the fall: University of Texas at Austin     Constunce Brantley LV Berkner High School Activities/Honors: Drill Team, Senior Lieutenant, AVID, National Honor Society, AP Ambassadors, Cheerleading, Band Plans to attend in the fall: Texas State University

Thomas Jordan
Jesuit College Preparatory School of Dallas

Activities/Honors: Baseball, Retreat leader, Ignatian Scholars Program, Restores classic cars

Volunteer work included: Hunger Busters

Plans to attend in the fall: University of Texas at Austin

 

 

Constunce Brantley
LV Berkner High School

Activities/Honors: Drill Team, Senior Lieutenant, AVID, National Honor Society, AP Ambassadors, Cheerleading, Band

Plans to attend in the fall: Texas State University

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

Dallas Students Say No To Drugs and Yes To Art

Each year the CARE team has the honor of choosing the winning artwork to be featured in our annual calendar. Hundreds of students from the Park Cities area of Dallas submitted their drawings for consideration. Each drawing came from a unique point of inspiration, but all followed a similar theme - staying far away from addictive substances and making healthy choices instead.

Thank you to all of the schools and teachers who guided their students on this project and opened their classrooms for discussion on the important topic of drug and alcohol awareness.

Cover Winner

Sam C. - "Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall. Don't Do Drugs At All!"

Sam C. - "Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall. Don't Do Drugs At All!"

January Winner

Alex S. - "Be Wise. Don't Smoke!"

Alex S. - "Be Wise. Don't Smoke!"

February Winner

Ellie I. - "Give nice hugs to defeat drugs!"

Ellie I. - "Give nice hugs to defeat drugs!"

March Winner

Aine N. - "Say no to drugs. Say yes to gym."

Aine N. - "Say no to drugs. Say yes to gym."

April Winner

Daniel M. - "Don't be a rotten egg!"

Daniel M. - "Don't be a rotten egg!"

May Winner

Grace T. - "Don't go with the flow...stay away from drugs!"

Grace T. - "Don't go with the flow...stay away from drugs!"

June Winner

Victoria C. - "I'd rather eat bugs than do drugs."

Victoria C. - "I'd rather eat bugs than do drugs."

July Winner

Livia L. - "Drugs stop dreams."

Livia L. - "Drugs stop dreams."

August Winner

Kara C. - "Don't drown in drugs."

Kara C. - "Don't drown in drugs."

September Winner

Lauren R. - "It doesn't take a genius to know that drugs are dumb!"

Lauren R. - "It doesn't take a genius to know that drugs are dumb!"

October Winner

Caroline Z. - "Addiction will haunt you for the rest of your life."

Caroline Z. - "Addiction will haunt you for the rest of your life."

November Winner

Joe C. - "This is your brain on drugs."

Joe C. - "This is your brain on drugs."

December Winner

Reese R. - "You will be on the naughty list if you take drugs!"

Reese R. - "You will be on the naughty list if you take drugs!"

Honorable Mentions

  • Berkley B.
  • Mina C.
  • Jayna D.
  • Aarian D.
  • Katie E.
  • Sydney H.
  • Hannah J.
  • Ava L.
  • Celina P.
  • Aubrey S.
  • Katy V.
  • Alexandra W.

 

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.

CARE Dallas Announces New Executive Director

CARE (Chemical Awareness Resources & Education) is pleased to announce Susan Morgan has been named the Executive Director by the CARE Board of Directors.

“Susan’s wealth of knowledge in program design, grant writing and partnership coalition will be invaluable to CARE” says Paula Hayes, Board President. “She is recognized state wide for her advocacy on behalf of the addiction and recovery community. Her passion for helping families and children affected by addiction is evident the minute you meet her.”

Susan Morgan graduated from Baylor University with a B.S in Education in 1977 and went on to earn her M.A. in Education from Sam Houston State University.  During her career Susan served as a Drug Prevention Education Specialist for the East Texas Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, and later became Executive Director of that organization. Most recently she held the role of Managing Director of the Junior League of Dallas. In each role, Susan remained focused on the community she served, while increasing the efficiency of the staff and resources.

“With over 25 years of experience working in the field of addiction, I am delighted to have the opportunity to continue my work in serving families who are struggling with addiction,” says Susan. “CARE’s programs are designed to meet individuals and families wherever they are in the process of seeking help and to offer the tools and support necessary to move toward healing and recovery.”


About CARE Dallas:
Established in 1984, CARE is a valuable community organization that funds education classes for families struggling with substance abuse; provides speakers for students, parents and educators in Dallas County; and serves as a no cost, confidential referral resource for anyone who needs help with alcohol or drug addiction. CARE serves more than 20,000 families each year through its programs.

Mary Martin

Mary is the founder of Lift Communications, a nonprofit marketing firm. She is also the Communications Manager for Touch A Life, an organization based in Dallas that provides care for child survivors of human trafficking in Ghana.

Mary loves reading, listening to podcasts, and baking bread. Orginially from Orlando, Florida, she lives in Frisco, Texas, with her husband, Damien, and their two young boys, Lucas and Elijah.